Goodman Lab In The Department of Molecular
and Cellular Physiology

Former Lab Members

Tom Andersson
toma-[at]-math-[dot]-su-[dot]-se

Amy Eastwood

Shana Geffeney

shana-[dot]-geffeney-[at]-usu-[dot]-edu

Last Seen: Lecturer, Utah State University

LinkedIn Profile

As a postdoc in the lab, Dr. Geffeney identified a novel DEG/ENaC protein, DEG-1, as the major mechanotransduction channel in ASH, a polymodal nociceptor in C. elegans. In parallel, she found that ASH TRPV channels are dispensable to mechanotransduction itself but required for behavioral responses to noxious stimuli. Because mammalian and insect nociceptors also coexpress DEG/ENaCs and TRPVs, the cellular functions for these ion channels may be conserved. Dr. Geffeney is currently a biology lecturer at USU-Uintah Basin.

Dominique Glauser

dominique-[dot]-glauser-[at]-unifr-[dot]-ch

LinkedIn Profile

While working in the Goodman lab, Dr. Glauser discovered that alternative splicing of three splice sites of the C. elegans slo-1 gene is coordinated such that exon combinations in the transcripts are non-random. A mutation in a UAAAUC element in an intron flanking one of the sites disrupts splicing coordination and synaptic transmission, indicating that proper coordination of intragenic alternative splicing is essential for normal physiology of slo-1 in vivo. He also showed that TRPV channels and the FLP-21/NPR-1 neuropeptide signaling pathway determine the threshold for heat avoidance in C. elegans. Dr. Glauser is now a group leader at University of Fribourg in Switzerland, where his team focuses on the mechanisms of nociception and aversive behavior in C. elegans.

Brandon Johnson

To explore the significance to protein function of alternative splicing, Dr. Johnson used electrophysiology to characterize currents through different isoforms of the slo-1 channel. He found that alternative exons A1 and A2, which encode the regulator of K(+) conductance (RCK)1 Ca(2+) coordination domain, regulate activation kinetics and Ca(2+) sensitivity, but only if exons are inserted at sites B and/or C, which extend a linker domain between RCK1 and RCK2. Thus, RCK1 interacts with the RCK1-RCK2 linker, and the effect of exon variation on gating depends on the combination of exons present in each isoform. This interplay between alternative splice sites had not previously been demonstrated.

Dong Wang

Dr. Wang investigated the molecular mechanism of temperature sensation in C. elegans, and used molecular techniques to identify new thermosensory molecules in AFD and other neurons.

Don Vongviphut

Undergraduate researcher

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As an undergraduate researcher in the lab, Don examined potential similarities between C. elegans MEC-6 channels and human PON-1 channels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rebecca Agin

Research Assistant, 2009-

LinkedIn Profile

Rebecca helped Dominique Glauser with SNP mapping to locate the position of a heat sensation mutation in C. elegans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Lee

hauchen-[at]-gmail-[dot]-com

Research Assistant until 2009

Last seen: Medical student, State University of New York at Buffalo

Tim’s job as a research assistant was to help run experiments, assist researchers in their projects, make sure the lab was in order and keep track of the worm database.

Bronwyn MacInnis

bm2-[at]-sanger-[dot]-ac-[dot]-uk

Postdoctoral Scholar, 2003-2007

Nicholas Dompe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicholas Dompe

Research Assistant II, 2005-2006

Website

Austin BrownAustin Brown

dokbrown-[at]-gmail-[dot]-com

Ph.D. Student, 2002-2007

Website

For his thesis work, Dr. Brown used mutagenesis and patch clamp electrophysiology to link structure with function in subunits of the mechanoelectrical transduction (MeT) complex. Dr. Brown and Dr. Silvia Fernandez-Illescas identified a role for MEC-4 and MEC-10’s ‘degeneration’ residue (A713) in channel gating and drug-binding. MEC-4 and MEC-10, the pore forming subunits of the MeT complex, have increased open probabilities when A713 is substituted with a large residue. Mutations of A713 also altered affinity for the antagonist amiloride, but in a size-independent manner. Taken together, these finding suggests that A713 may be located at the beginning of a pore-forming domain. In a second study, Dr. Brown found that MEC-2 and MEC-6, auxiliary subunits to the MeT core, increase macroscopic current by increasing the number of channels in an active state. His findings suggest that MEC-2 and MEC-6 play essential roles in modulating both the local membrane environment of MEC-4/MEC-10 channels and the availability of such channels to be gated by force in vivo. Based on his experience as a physiologist, Dr. Brown also developed and published instructions for microelectrode pulling and patch clamp recording of oocytes for a variety of applications.

Silvia Fernandez Illescas

Ph.D. Student, 2005-2007

LinkedIn profile

As a Ph.D. student, Dr. Fernandez-Illescas worked with Dr. Austin Brown to identify a role for MEC-4 and MEC-10’s ‘degeneration’ residue (A713) in channel gating and drug-binding. MEC-4 and MEC-10, the pore forming subunits of the MeT complex, have increased open probabilities when A713 is substituted with a large residue. Mutations of A713 also altered affinity for the antagonist amiloride, but in a size-independent manner. Taken together, these finding suggests that A713 may be located at the beginning of a pore-forming domain.

Misty Montoya

misty_montoya-[at]-yahoo-[dot]-com

Undergraduate researcher

 

 

Daniel Ramot

Daniel Ramot
Ph.D. Student, 2002-2007
daniel.ramot-[at]-gmail-[dot]-com
Website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helen Shen
LSRT, 2003-2005
hshen9-[at]-itsa-[dot]-ucsf-[dot]-edu

 

Adranne

Adrienne Yanez
SSRP 2005
adrienne_yanez-[at]-hotmail-[dot]-com

Not Pictured:

  • Namiko Abe (MIT), SSRP 2002
  • Nhu-An Le, Undergraduate Researcher (Brown), 2002-2003
  • Wilfred Tang, Undergraduate Researcher (Stanford), 2002
  • Ashni Mohnot, Undergraduate Researcher (Stanford), 2003
  • Daniel Lara (U. New Mexico), SSRP 2003
  • Tommie R. Berry, Jr. (Morehouse College), SSRP 2007
  • Nicole Titus (Chauminade University), SSRP 2008

2009 Lab Photo

Principal Investigator
Miriam Goodman

Postdoctoral Scholars
Juan G. Cueva
Amy Eastwood
Shana Geffeney
Dominique Glauser
Brandon Johnson
Valeria Vásquez
Dong Wang

2009 LabPhoto

 

 

 

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